Posts in Sowing
Factors to consider when draining rice (February 2015)


This NSW DPI Primefact sheet is and overview of the guidelines to take into consideration when considering draining rice. The fact sheets covers areas such as the variety selection and time of sowing, the water management after flowering. It covers the key factors such as field layout, crop nitrogen, time when crop maturing , sowing methods, time of draining, grain development stages soil types and who and where to contact for further information. 

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Managment of drill sown rice (October 2012)


This fact sheet is a guideline for the management of drill sown rice. It is divided into sections and a brief overview is given. The fact sheets includes, site preparation, sowing time followed by Management at sowing with subheadings including seed placement, sowing rate, row spacing and fertilizer at sowing. The following section include herbicide application and irrigation management with a brief of 1st and second flushes. There is a section on in crop fertilisation, pre permanent water application, permanent water and Pi nitrogen. 

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The Happy Seeder enables direct drilling of wheat into rice stubble (January 2007)

This journal article present the results of the Happy seeder direct drilling wheat into rice stubble. The Happy seeder aims to reduce the need to burn rice stubble and in Australia and South East Asia. The focus of the Happy seeder is to enable direct drilling into tough dense rice stubble which is currently an obstruction to sowing into rice stubble. The article states that loss of organic matter and nutrients, rice stubble burning causes very serious and widespread air pollution in the north-west Indo-Gangetic Plains, where rice–wheat systems predominate. The Happy Seeder combines the stubble mulching and seed drilling functions in the one machine. The stubble is cut and picked up in front of the sowing tynes, which engage bare soil, and deposited behind the seed drill as mulch. This article presents the  evaluation of the technology over 3 years in replicated experiments and farmers’ fields in Punjab, India. 

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Improving the Water use efficiency of rice (2003)

This CRC report presents the results of the project on improving water use efficiency of rice. The projects objectives were to investigate opportunities to improve the water use efficiency of rice crop by comparing the raised bed layout with conventional aerial sowing on a flat layout. The project also investigated the water use of short season varieties. The project was undertaken to evaluate the water use of rice grown on a raised bed layout using two soil types used in rice production a transitional red brown earth and a grey cracking clay. A replicated comparison with aerial sown fully ponded crop will be undertaken. 

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The rice CRC's soil nitrogen test- an update and invitation to participate. (August 2001)


This IREC Farmer Newsletter article provides an overview of the past two seasons of research into soil nitrogen tests. The CRC for Sustainable rice production is developing a soil test based on near infrared (NIR) spectroscopy to provide a guide to the optimal pre sowing nitrogen fertilizer for a whole field. A recent unexpected application of this test showed that it predicted yield variation within a single field. This capability has an immediate application in the site specific management of rice.

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The potential of green manuring legume pasture (May, 1993)


This IREC Farmers Newsletter presents information on the increase in rice production area and decrease in rice/pasture rotations and the effects this is having on nitrogen fertiliser use.  One potential area to elevate this issue is incorporation of pastures and the use of short season rice varieties. This article presents results of a preliminary trial undertaken in the Murrami district in 1991/92 season. The conclusion of this preliminary trial was that cultivation should be carried out close to the time of rice sowing to allow for reduction in nitrogen losses. The pasture incorporation decreased the applied nitrogen requirement to achieve high yields compared to conventional practice of removal of pastures. It was relatively small amount of incorporation and a with larger amounts of pastures there could be possible greater yield response. The potential problems of seedling establishment, slime, straighthead and blood worm were not encountered in this trial. Further trials were planned for the following season. 

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Puddling, good results in growers' paddocks in 1992/93 (May 1993)

This IREC Farmers Newsletter article present results from the 1992/93 season trial on puddling. The trial included six paddocks in the Coleambally region that were puddle prior to sowing. The articles covers the effect of puddling on rice, physchology of puddling, traps to avoid when puddling these included water too deep and turbid water. The article presents information on effects of puddling on deep percolation and water use and what the rice water consumption and weather was in 1992/93. Further studies were required to present results and the trial was continuing in 93/94.

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Reducing water use in rice (March 1992)

This IREC Farmers Newsletter article presents the results of research undertaken to investigate the effects of rotary hoeing as a soil treatment for reducing groundwater accessions. There were three steps to the technique and these included flooding the field for two days followed by rotary hoeing the soil to 100-150 mm when the water level was at 20mm. The paddock was then topped up with water required for aerial sowing. The field is then kept flooded for five months or until crop maturity. The author states that the initial results did not indicate any adverse effects in terms of nitrogen up take it actually appeared to slightly improve. They also stated that the challenges for future project and commercial use were evaluating and developing technique for commercial use and ensuring that the hoeing does not make the soil unsuitable for other crops with out expensive re working.

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