Posts tagged Agriculture
Native frogs born in rice bays consume rice pests (2007)

This IREC Farmers Newsletter article presents an update on the RIRDC funded project UCA 11A investigating native frogs n rice. The investigation was undertaken in rice crops in the Riverina, NSW in regards to possibility that insectivorous frogs may be important for pest control in agricultural ecosystems. It has been estimated that nearly five billion frogs may be produced in rice bays in the Riverina each year. The investigation has also noted that native frogs born in rice bays consume a wide range of invertebrate pest species. The report includes and overview of the importance of frogs in the agro ecosystem. How many frogs are actually in the Riverina and what these frogs are consuming.  

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Riverina Agricultural women : Inspiration for women by women - Link (August 2006)

This RIRDC report provides an analysis of the project Riverina agricultural women: inspiration for women by women and includes the initiatives undertaken by RAW. The aim of the project was to create a comfortable environment for women to feel confident to participate. To achieve this women were encouraged to network, understand, contribute and work in partnership with established rural women’s networks. The project also aimed to build on rural women’s confidence, increase their contribution to economic, social and environmental sustainability, promote the visibility of rural women. It also focussed of positioning the RAW as an open forum for women assist in providing and supporting education, training and leadership opportunities. Several key strategies were implemented to achieve these objectives for the project these included, inspirational speakers, skills training, crop tours, self development opportunities, overseas study grants. It identifies the barriers to further participation of women in training opportunities such as distance, provision of childcare and the culture of their community and industry.

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Evaluating Diversity Array Technology for the NSW Rice Breeding Program - Link (June 2006)

This RIRDC report presents the findings from the project Evaluating Diversity array technology for the NSW rice industry. The aim and objectives of the project included; Examining diversity array technology (DArT) to build an understanding of the technology. Contructing a DArT reference panel necessary for ongoing DArT analysis of varieties and breeding lines. Finally to assess the potential of the technology for intergration into NSW Rice breeding program.  The project was divided into three phases. There were three key out comes of the project which included; highlighting the capability of DArT to provide detailed genetic fingerprints of varieties, to distinguish closely related lines, and to establish relationships between lines providing useful information for choosing parental combinations for breeding. The project concluded that the future association studies relating agronomic and grain quality data will determine if DArT markers can replace existing molecular marker tests such as for fragrance. It is also concluded that DArT analysis will play an increasing role in the rice breeding program because the cost per marker is low, its highly automated system has high throughput capacity, and the data generated will have increasing value with continuing advances in bioinformatics.

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Volatile aroma compunds of Australian Rice varieties (January 2001)

Fragrant rice is characterised by its pleasant fragrance and aroma. High milling returns and good cooking quality are often associated with fragrant rice (Nagaraju et al., 1975; Tripathi and Rao, 1979). However, fragrant cultivars often have undesirable agronomic characteristics such as low yield, susceptibility to pests and diseases and strong shedding (Berner and Hoff, 1986). Therefore, breeders wish to develop fragrant varieties with high yield and good resistance to pests.  Rice aroma is known to be genetically controlled (Reddy and Sathyanarayanaiah, 1980).  The study of rice aroma will be useful for identifying and locating the genes involved in the expression of this character. The characterisation of fragrant rice aroma will also provide markers to evaluate new fragrant varieties. Fragrant rice commands a high price compared to other rice. There is a strong incentive for its fraudulent adulteration. The ability to discriminate fragrant rice from cheaper, inferior rice varieties would protect the consumer and the honest trader. Therefore, the characterisation of fragrant rice aroma will benefit breeders, growers, marketers and millers of fragrant rice.

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Agronomic performance of YRL20 (1981)

This IREC Farmers Newsletter presents information on the performance on the replacement for Inga, YRL20. Results show YRL20 has higher average yield, more stable yield, earlier maturity and has cold tolerance. There were however disadvantages to YRL20 that included susceptible to lodging, pubescent, and inferior seedlings vigour. The author does conclude that the advantages do out weigh the disadvantages. 

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Annual Report to IREC 1972-73 - Rice Research (1973)


Departmental rice research, based at Yanco Agricultural College and Research Centre, is oriented to the recognition and solution of industry problems through research on breeding, agronomy, soil chemistry, plant physiology, crop protection and grain quality.  Investigations are also carried out at the Falkiner Memorial Field Station (CSIRO) in Deniliquin, at the Leeton Agricultural Research Station and on many farmers' properties.  Statistical analysis of all data obtained from the breeding and agronomy projects is carried out by Mr P. Lind in Sydney.  Seasonal conditions were very favourable for early growth and development.  Very high temperatures in late December and January may have reduced yields in some early flowering crops. Minimum temperatures during meiosis and flowering did not fall below a critical level and this encouraged a very high percentage grain set.  Rain interrupted harvest and caused serious lodging, harvest delays and a reduced grain quality of late harvested crops.

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Annual Report of the Rice section of Yanco Agricultural College and Research Station 1969-70 (1970)

Generally, seasonal conditions were unfavourable for rice growing. After a very wet winter and early spring, it proved difficult to obtain a well graded seedbed. The soil was, however, in a moist condition for sowing. Weather conditions were suitable for quick emergence and good early growth of rice.  Cool conditions prevailed until ear initiation early in January. Rice crops generally were not well developed for that time of the year. After a week of heatwave conditions in early February, some very cold nights were experienced in the second week of February. This resulted in high percentage sterility in the rice flowering at this stage. Ripening of rice crops was extremely slow. Harvest commenced late as moisture contents dropped very slowly. Harvesting was interrupted by rainfall on a number of occasions. Mice were very troublesome from the milk stage on and considerable damage was done on the headlands and in some plots. Generally, it was considered a poor rice growing season. A record acreage of 96,584 acres was planted. Big extensions of area occurred in Coleambally and the Berriquin Irrigation District. The proportion of the long grain variety Kulu increased to 17.5%. The average yield for the whole area was 2.48 tons/acre. This yield was the lowest since 196/65.  Whole grain mill returns of Calrose were extremely good, whilst Kulu gave much uneven maturity and chalky grain, which resulted in very low whole grain yields for this long grain variety.

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Rice Research at Yanco during 1967-68 PART 1 (1968)

In the absence of the rice breeder, MR, D.J. McDonald, now studying for his Ph.D. degree in Texas, a reduced. but still rather large breeding programme was carried out by Mr, Ed, Boerema, agronomist. (rice) YAC & RS, the main features of this programme were:- The disappointing yielding ability and very difficult threshing in the Murray Valley of most of the early maturing, Japanese, cold-tolerant varieties.  The selection of an excellently shaped, very early maturing, long-grain from irradiated seed of YR 1-7-18.  Two lines will be included in variety trials in the Murray Valley and at Yanco next season.  The selection of twelve long-grain lines from YR 6, YR 11, and YR 13 for yield and adaptability trials in the Murrumbidgee Irrigation Area.  The selection of many medium and long-grain lines of a suitable growth period from the mid-November sown breeding programme. The excellent performance of back-crossed selections of Kulu with varieties of a better quality. The selection of two quick-emerging, earlier-maturing Calrose strains, which will be yield tested next season.

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