Posts tagged Germ
Rice phenology (March 2015)

This Poster presented at the Rice field day at RRAPL in March 2015 by Brian Dunn from NSW DPI Yanco. The poster presents information on phenology of rice and the variability that occurs as a result of varieties, sowing, nitrogen rate and timing. The understanding of the phenology assist agronomic management and the this can lead to improvements of yield and quality.

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Pathogenicity, diversity, biology and sources of resistance to Pseudomonas fuscovaginae in rice (March 2013)

Pseudomonas fuscovaginae is a bacterial pathogen of rice that causes sheath brown rot, grain discolouration and panicle sterility. It is slowly gaining recognition as a yield constraint of rice in many regions of the world. Although, P. fuscovaginae was first reported in Australia in 2009, there is little information available on the relative pathogenicity and aggressiveness of the Australian strains when compared to world strains. In this thesis its pathogenicity and aggressiveness, as well as prevalence in the rice growing areas of the Riverina region in New South Wales Australia were presented. Australian strains were more pathogenic and aggressive than world strains. The DAR 77138 strain from Australia was the most pathogenic and aggressive. A further survey of bacteria associated with discolouration of the panicle and sheath in the rice growing areas of the Riverina region in NSW Australia in 2010, failed to find any P. fuscovaginae.

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Biotechnology to Improve Rice Breeding Techniques (March 2007)

This RIRDC report presents the findings from the one year project on biotechnology to improve rice breeding. The report the outlines the project results which aimed at improving the microspore culture technology, which can produce genetically uniform double haploid (DH) plants in one generation from crosses between selected parent lines. The progress in incorporation of cold tolerance from Chinese germplasm into Australian rice is also reported. The objectives of the project were to improve breeding efficiency as well as cold tolerance rice microspore culture enabled DH plant production technology, which was incorporating cold tolerance from Chinese germplasm. Experiments were undertaken in glasshouses using the methods of hydroponics to grow the experimental material. Improvements in plants regeneration from MC derived callus was achieved via modifications to the callus induction and regeneration media which led to improvements in callus quality and the frequency of regeneration. To investigate cold tolerance for 4 days at Panicle initiation stage the rice germplasm and segregating populations derived from different crosses were subjected to a low temperature treatment at 12 – 14°C. Cold tolerant germplasm and individual plants were selected for crossing and backcrossing. A two-step induction culture medium has improved callus quality and plant regeneration. Some DH plants have been produced.  The key findings included four Chinese varieties demonstrated strong cold tolerance under our testing conditions. These varieties have been crossed with Australian varieties. Some cold tolerant F2 plants have been selected for backcrossing to ‘Doongara’. The hybrids of the crosses have being processed for DH plant production. 

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Growing rice with less water (2006)

The Australian rice industry is a world leader in yields, quality and marketing. Water supply is fast becoming its greatest limitation. Can we find a rice growing system that will grow more rice per megalitre?  This Nuffield study overviewed work in several countries that is attempting to adopt aerobic and alternate-wet-and-dry (AWD) rice systems to increase water use efficiency.  The application of such systems in Australian rice growing has potential to lead to a 15–30% increase in water use efficiency, from evaporation savings.  Success of aerobic or AWD systems in Australia would require the rice industry to assess and adopt aerobic germplasm, refine AWD nitrogen management, consider Clearfield™ technology for broadleaf weed control and redefine rice soil suitability for AWD systems

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Study tour of Japan, Canada and the USA (2001)

This CRC report presents information on the study tour undertaken by Graeme Batten NSW DPI.  The study tour included visits to Aichi Prefectural Agriculture institute in Japan where he compared rice production techniques. The tour included a presentation of papers at the 9th International conference on Near Infrared Spectorcopy. A visit to McMaster university Ontario Canada and a the National small grains germplasm facility in Idaho where he learnt methods being used to identify nutrient efficient genotypes of rice corn and Barley with the overall trip to gather germplasm for the Australian rice industry. 

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2nd International Temperate Rice Conference-Conference opens up possibility for new research techniques. (2000)

This IREC Farmers Newsletter article presents a travel report on the 2nd International Rice conference. A group of industry representatives  including rice growers, researchers and extension personnel attended the Conference in Sacromento followed by a tour of the US rice industry of California, and southern rice producing states of Akanas, Lousiana and Mississippi.  The report presents a summary of the conference and post conference tour and actions that will be implemented as a result of the information. It concluded that sourcing international germplasm will become harder because of legal issues and the search for early vigor could be enhanced by testing in Arkanas, USA. 

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Watermoulds on germinating rice. (June 1994)

This IREC Farmer Newsletter article offers advice on the threadlike watermoulds commonly seen in rice around germination. The article states that under controlled environmental conditions that the water mould does not hinder the germination and growth of rice. However it does acknowledge that rice grown in fields may have been affected by some other factors which may not have affected the growth of water mould. The article states that a fast healthy growing plant will over take the affects of watermould.

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Preparing rice seed for Aerial sowing (1977)


Rice seed to be aerially sown requires a period of pre-germination before flying onto the paddock.  Over past seasons poor establishment of rice crops has often been found to be due to variable germination of seed and uneven distribution.  The recommended method of seed preparation is to soak for 24 hours in water (channel or dam) and then stack bags together on the ground or truck for a further 24-36 hours.  It is during the stacking that the all-important germination phase commences.

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Preparing rice seed for aerial sowing (1977)

This IREC Farmers Newsletter article presents information on preparing rice seed for aerial sowing. The article states that in previous season poor establishment had been a result of variable germination of seed and uneven distribution. The article focuses on stacking, temperature, insulation and roots and shoots. The article summaries that the pre germination of rice seed should be carried out carefully for aerial sowing. It states to soak for 24 hours followed by stacking for 24-36 hours and to ensure insulation during this period and to sow prior to the shoot becoming too long.

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Is your Barnyard grass really necessary? (1969)


This question was asked by Mr D. J, Swain, Research Agronomist, (Weeds), Yanco Agricultural College & Research Station.  The day is past when barnyard grass was considered an unavoidable evil in rice growing, any rice grower who has a grass-infested rice crop this season has only himself to blame.  Two effective herbicides are at present available for the control of barnyard grass in rice.  One of these, propanil, sold as "Stam F-34", R has been available for the past six years. The other, molinate, sold as "Ordram", R was first available in the 1966-67 season.

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Aerial sowing of Rice (1969)

Aerial sowing was introduced into the Murray Valley in 1963 said Former District Agronomist, Mr B J Scott, two areas of 20 acres were sown at Tullakool in conjunction with salted land reclamation investigations being carried out at that time, since then the aerial sown acreage has increased to over 10,000 acres in 1968.

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The Art of growing rice (1969)

More than half the success in rice growing is tied up over the first 6-8 weeks in the establishment of the crop said the principle agronomist (irrigation) Mr Don Wallin. A good stand is a must if maximum yield and return to growers is to be achieved.  Although it is well recognised that the rice plant has a prolific tillering habit, thus compensating considerably when a thin stand has occurred, the most successful yields are obtained from well-established crops. INCOMPLETE

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