Posts tagged Grain
Factors to consider when draining rice (February 2015)


This NSW DPI Primefact sheet is and overview of the guidelines to take into consideration when considering draining rice. The fact sheets covers areas such as the variety selection and time of sowing, the water management after flowering. It covers the key factors such as field layout, crop nitrogen, time when crop maturing , sowing methods, time of draining, grain development stages soil types and who and where to contact for further information. 

Read More
Improving techniques for assessing rice grain quality. (2008)

This IREC Farmers Newsletter report gives and overview of the 2006/07 season project of improving techniques for assessing rice grain quality. The project continued to evaluate the quality parameters of rice breeding lines and to improve screening techniques for more accuracy and efficiency under the Rice Grain Quality Project. A greater emphasis is being placed on the use of molecular markers to assist selection. The project has also focused on understanding the genetic characteristics that are linked to the cooking quality of different types of rice. This article focuses on grain quality, measurements of amylose types, validation and implementation of new methods, effect of starch components on cooking starch branching enzymes in Australian rice.

Read More
Linking starch structure to rice cooking quality. (2008)

This IREC Farmers Newsletter articles presents information and an update  on the RIRDC funded project DAN212A on cooking quality. Cooking quality and specifically the structure and characteristics of starch in rice determine the use of rice in cooking and industry. This study focused on two types of starch, amylose and amylopectin. These two starches determine cooking quality in rice It investigated measure to predict cooking quality, amylose and amylospectin grain quality, waxy rice properties, protein and pasting properties, amylopectin structure and finally differences in resistant heat. This study is giving understanding to starch structure which in turn will increase the likelihood of creating designer rice varieties aimed at specific markets. In conclusion this study suggest that that a specific element of one of the starches in rice grain, the hot water soluble fraction of amylopectin, may be contributing to peak viscosity, texture of the cooked rice and glycaemic index. 

Read More
The Happy Seeder enables direct drilling of wheat into rice stubble (January 2007)

This journal article present the results of the Happy seeder direct drilling wheat into rice stubble. The Happy seeder aims to reduce the need to burn rice stubble and in Australia and South East Asia. The focus of the Happy seeder is to enable direct drilling into tough dense rice stubble which is currently an obstruction to sowing into rice stubble. The article states that loss of organic matter and nutrients, rice stubble burning causes very serious and widespread air pollution in the north-west Indo-Gangetic Plains, where rice–wheat systems predominate. The Happy Seeder combines the stubble mulching and seed drilling functions in the one machine. The stubble is cut and picked up in front of the sowing tynes, which engage bare soil, and deposited behind the seed drill as mulch. This article presents the  evaluation of the technology over 3 years in replicated experiments and farmers’ fields in Punjab, India. 

Read More
New tools for precise and efficient grain evaluation - Text Errors no pasting (2006)

The Yanco Agricultural Institute is the office of the rice breeders who develop new rice varieties suited to different niche markets and a wide range of cuisines. This pamphlet covers the role of the cereal chemistry team and the 2004/05 highlights. To create this varieties there are many stages in the breeding process and a key role is the rice chemistry team. They play a pivotal role in evaluating the grain quality parameters of various crossbreds and providing precise and timely information to breeders. To continue in this role they require to improve the efficiency and accuracy in evaluate the quality traits the rice chemistry team endeavours to adopt new tools and technologies to improve the current grain quality evaluation procedures. To continue with the demands of the program the purchase of a new grain inspector 'Cervitec' and the implementation of new molecular techniques, quality parameters of breeding lines can now be assessed more precisely, thus assisting rice breeders to develop new varieties more quickly. In this pamphlet the highlights of 2004/05 included new molecular markers for genetic evaluation, grain storage, pasting properties, new technologies to extract and analyse aromatic compounds from fragrant rice and the evaluation of new instruments for quality attributes.

Read More
Understanding the genetics of rice cooking quality (2006)

This IREC Farmers Newsletter presents an overview of a RIRDC funded project on genetics adn rice quality. Genetic make up of  the variety can dictates its specific cooking properties and therefore identification of precise traits will allows for gene specific markers to be developed. Therefore understanding of the precise role of various starch synthesis genes and establishing detection tools for these genes enables the use of  valuable genetic information which can allow for faster development of rice fasters. It also permits the breeders to predict the accurate quality traits while also giving the ability to identify different rice varieties by DNA finger printing.

Read More
New tools for precise and efficient grain evaluation (2006)

This IREC farmers newsletter is report covers the role of the cereal chemistry team and the 2004/05 highlights. To create this varieties there are many stages in the breeding process and a key role is the rice chemistry team. They play a pivotal role in evaluating the grain quality parameters of various crossbreds and providing precise and timely information to breeders. To continue in this role they require to improve the efficiency and accuracy in evaluate the quality traits the rice chemistry team endeavours to adopt new tools and technologies to improve the current grain quality evaluation procedures. To continue with the demands of the program the purchase of a new grain inspector 'Cervitec' and the implementation of new molecular techniques, quality parameters of breeding lines can now be assessed more precisely, thus assisting rice breeders to develop new varieties more quickly. In this pamphlet the highlights of 2004/05 included new molecular markers for genetic evaluation, grain storage, pasting properties, new technologies to extract and analyse aromatic compounds from fragrant rice and the evaluation of new instruments for quality attributes. 

Read More
Development of Rice Milling In-Line Process Control (2005)

This CRC Project was undertaken to investigate and take advantage of modern systems. Two focus areas were the continuous improvement systems and the process control systems. The focus of Continous improvement systems was to implement an improvement methodology that could apply across the business. Whilst the Process control system was to develop an automated systems to monitor and aid control of the rice milling process. This in turn is aimed at improving milling quality, quality repeatability and mill efficiency. Area reviewed and enhanced in Process control system included Computer control of the vertical milling process, Moisture meter (Grainspec) automatic interface to mill control system (PLC) and On-line Process Weighing system implementation in Leeton Mill and integrated web-based reporting system. This project was a follow on from and early project in 2000/01 and this report main focus was on Continuous Improvement and On-Line Process Weighing. The results of the project are presented in the pilot Six Sigma approach to process improvements that have delivered significant benefits to SunRice that have been rolled out across all areas of the business. Results were also indicated with the implementation of large training program with approximately 150 staff trained to a detailed level and a further 150 staff trained to an introductory level.

Read More
Investigating links between minerals in rice grain and straighthead (2003)

This CRC report presents the findings of the project undertaking investigating links between minerals in rice grain and straighthead. The project reported, the current understanding of Straighthead, its symptoms and occurrence; crop surveys which were conducted in 1998/99 and 1999/2000; and  mineral analyses of grains from plants affected by Straighthead. With the key finding presented; Straighthead was mainly observed in crops grown after pasture or other rice crops where the stubble was incorporated. It was more prevalent in the rice varieties Langi and Koshihikari. Whilst there are obvious symptoms of Straighthead in relatively few rice crops; but reductions in yield also occur across large areas without any visible symptoms of Straighthead appearing. The rice grains from crops visibly affected by Straighthead were found to have higher concentrations of mineral elements and possibly inferior mill-out. Finally the cost of Straighthead to the rice industry is estimated to exceed one million dollars per year.

Read More
Downloading weather data with maNage rice version 5.1 (2002)

This IREC Farmer Newsletter article is information regarding Downloading weather data with manage rice version 5.1.  The latest version of maNage Rice has an option to download temperature an solar radiation data from the internet. The data are used to predict stage of rice development and yield response to topdressed nitrogen, and can also be graphed to show the difference from average. Details are provided on how rice growers and advisers can obtain free copies and the computer requirements for running this program. Future versions are planned with more use of downloaded weather data for example, optimum draining date and grain cracking in relation to harvest date.

Read More
Increasing on farm yields based on physiology research beyond 2000 (January 2002)

This IREC Farmer Newsletter report present results of a RIRDC project undertaken on increasing farm yields based on physiology research.  The aim of the project was to investigate increasing yield potential of new rice varieties with the outcome to help farmers to manage N fertilizer. District nitrogen trials were undertaken, investigations of PI nitrogen uptake and understanding rice yield potential. MaNage rice version 5.0 was released to growers in December in December 2000. Version 5.0 included a new slide, which predicts crop development. The high yield potential of the short season variety Jarrah at high N rates was found to be due to extended period of grain filling, ie from flowering to maturity. 

Read More
Microwaving rice may help grain moisture determination (August 2001)


This IREC Farmers Newsletter article presents information on how to undertake the microwaving method and using a microwave to estimate grain moisture. It states a microwave oven and kitchen balance may lead to better decisions for lock up or drainage for rice harvest, by providing a quick and simple estimate for grain moisture. The article concluded that drying grain in a microwave oven has the potential to be rapid measure of grain moisture. The method could be used to track the moisture content of the grain as the grain progresses towards harvest as well as for determining moisture at a particular point in time, eg lock up prior to harvest. 

Read More
Determining soil minerals role in rice quantity and quality (2000)

This IREC Farmers Newsletter article presents an update of results for the RIRDC project DAN 175A investigating determining soil mineral roles in rice quantity and quality. The project is in three parts with the first aim of the project to determine the influence of soil factors on plant growth, nutrient uptake, grain yield and grain quality. Aim two is to determine the variation in the soil plant and grain minerals within a field and ability to detect this variation using remote imagining. The third aim is  to determine the critical nutrient concentration in rice shoots and grain.

Read More
Chalk in medium- grain in 1996/97 (1998)

This IREC Farmer Newsletter article presents information on the RIRDC funded project DAN 147A that was investigating chalk in medium grain. The article presents information on starch accumulation during grain filling in rice, the implication of chalkiness in under fertilized rice crops, early drainage. The article also presents information of the future of the project and further studies into chalk in rice. 

Read More