Posts tagged Grow
Rice Extension on the New Grower Services Web Portal for SunRice (2014)

Access to the RICE EXTENSION TAB will be for all growers who will have a login, and also to Advisors, non-SunRice growers, researchers who will need to be set up with a login password access. This group are an important link for future extension to be successful.

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Approaches to Managing Variability of Rice Growth and Yield- Link (March 2013)

This RIRDC report is aimed at rice growers, commercial and public advisory agronomists, rice researchers, irrigation surveyors and designers, and landforming operators in rice growing areas. The report outlines investigations into the causes of in-field variability of rice crop growth, yield and management options for improving the poor yielding areas. The project consisted of three main objectives including firstly identify and understand factors contributing to in-field spatial variability in rice yield. Secondly identify and evaluate methods by which rice growers can manage in-field spatial variability in yield to increase production, profitability and water productivity and thirdly to maintain the NIR calibrations and instruments for the rice NIR Tissue Testing Service and update the associated PI nitrogen topdressing recommendations. The project was undertaken using replicated field experiments which were located in multiple rice growers’ fields in areas of both natural soil (no cut or fill) and subsoil surfaces which had been exposed by laser levelling operations. Soil treatments consisted of both chemical fertiliser (with varying major and minor nutrients) and organic fertilisers (chicken litter and feedlot manure). Rice establishment, growth and yield were monitored and measured. Generally three sets of field experiments were implemented each season. In conjunction with this experiment each year of the project there were complementary extensive large pot experiments undertaken in a polyhouse at Yanco Agricultural Institute The research identified that most of the in-field variability in rice growth and yield variability could be attributed to poor growth and low yield being obtained on exposed sub-soil surfaces due to macro and micro nutrient deficiencies and interactions. Significant increase in rice crop growth and yield were obtained by applications of high rates of nitrogen and phosphorus fertilisers to exposed subsoils. Rice crop growth and yield responses were also were found on red brown earth soils with the application of zinc, either in the fertiliser mix sown with the seed or as a seed coat. The researchers believe that targeted applications (based on soil tests) of phosphorus and zinc, along with good pre-permanent water and PI nitrogen management will increase yields in exposed subsoil areas of rice fields. This will decrease in-field rice yield variability resulting in increased rice production and water productivity across the industry and provide flow-on economic benefits to regional communities.

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Understanding & managing in-field variability of rice growth & yield (2008)

This IREC Farmers Newsletter present a brief on the RIRDC project investigation understanding and managing in feidl variability of frice growth and yield. The project began in 2006/2007. The project aims were to identify factors that are causal to within field yield variability by undertaking in field experiments, to build a methods to lessen the effect of these factors whilst maintain NIR rice tissue testing capability. Results of 2006-2007 were reduced due to reduction in water allocations as a result of the drought. It was however concluded that preliminary results illustrate possible relationships between EM and cut and fill with grain yield. It is acknowledge due to the season that a comprehensive analysis of relationships between soil property and nutrient results and crop growth and yield will be carried out. The author states the project will continue to undertake further experiments to determine if the identified causes of variability are common among fields and if low yielding areas can be increased to levels at least similar to that of the current field average.

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Understanding, Quantifying and Managing Spatial Variability of Rice Growth and Yield- Link (August 2008)

This RIRDC report is presenting results from the project Understanding, Quantifying and Managing Spatial Variability of Rice Growth and Yield. The project was designed to investigate field variation in rice crops and further develop technology for managing fertiliser applications to improve yields and efficiency. There were four distinct areas focussed on 1: identifying sources of within-field yield variation; 2: using hyperspectral images to identify yield variation; 3: developing the NIR tissue nitrogen test with a new instrument and new capabilities; and 4:expanding of the capabilities of the maNage rice decision support system to include management of spatial variation related to crop nitrogen status. The report is targeted at rice growers, research, advisory and commercial rice agronomists, irrigation surveyors, and designers and landforming contractors. There were seven key findings which included 1: Yield variation is related to cut and fill depths and landforming strategies. 2: Landforming effects persist for long periods. 3: Large amounts of yield variation associated with landforming is due to the depleted supply of mineralised nitrogen in the cut areas. This can be partly overcome with additional N fertiliser applied to those areas. 4: Some evidence was indicated of lower phosphorus availability and high pH on cut areas due to the exposure of subsoils. Further research is needed to confirm this result. 5: The NIR rice tissue testing service was successfully supported and the Bruker FT-NIR instrument integrated into the service. 6:The reduced rice areas due to drought and the inability to access hyperspectral data from satellite data sources halted progress on the hyperspectral objectives of the project. 7: The maNage Rice decision support system was updated to consider zone management approaches. 

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Understanding, Quantifying and Managing Spatial Variability of Rice Growth and Yield - Link (August 2008)

This report is a RIRDC report on the aims and results of a project undertaken on  understanding the factors contributing to spatial variability in rice yield. It also aimed to provide tools to manage variability, and hence to increase productivity, profitability and water productivity. The project was undertaken by using field investigations of rice growth and variability. These were investigated were undertaken by maintenance and improvement of the NIR rice tissue test service. This was carried out through the integration of improved NIR hardware and the comparison of strengths and weaknesses of satellite and airborne hyperspectral sensors for tissue testing purposes. It also investigated the in-corporation of the assembled knowledge, material and data into the zone management component of the maNageRice software program. It was concluded that the investigations highlighted the existing infield variabilities such as rice growth and yield. It also highlighted the impact of land-forming. The report is a valuable resource for future work involved in this area and recommended the need for further investigations. 

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Permanent beds in bays for sustainable cropping (2007)

This IREC Farmers Newsletter reports on the continuation of the permanent beds for sustainable cropping which has been running since 2000. The reports for 2005, 2006, and 2007 are included in this library.  The report covers 05/06 results, weed control, rice growth and yields, irrigation and fertilisers. This report concluded that high yields of wheat were achieved in 2005. This was seen on both raised beds and flat layouts – in a year without rainfall- induced water logging in winter or spring. It was also seen that the rice yields on both raised beds and flat treatments were excellent during an exceptional rice growing season. It was acknowledged that the rice yield from the bed systems is as high as that from conventional flat systems where rice is grown using permanent flooded conditions and deep water is applied during the early microspore stage.

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Factors reducing rice establishment (August 2001)

This IREC Farmer Newsletter presents the results of a seven year grower survey undertaken in Finley region. The results of the farmer survey identify factors that impact on successful rice establishment. Ducks and wind are the main factors contributing to poor rice crop establishment. Deep water, as a result of heavy rain or herbicide use requirement, is also a significant factor.

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A LABOUR saving method to accelerate rice breeding (1998)

This IREC farmers Newsletter articles present and update of the RIRDC project CSP 3A. The method used in this project was to grow rice hydroponically in tanks filled with river pebbles. It was developed to test whether plants could be made male sterile but remain female fertile by excluding boron from medium during sensitive phases. This was to replace the manual emasculation process in breeding programs. Though sterility was achieved, it was never 100% thus precluding use of the method for emasculation. The pebble method has potential for application in other breeding programs. Since the rice roots can be easily separated from the pebbles, the method will allow lines to be rapidly screened for the size of their root system and for growth rate of entire plants. This project did not achieve its primary aim however useful by product of this short project has been the development of the system of growing rice in washed pebbles and nutrient solutions. The system allows ready measurements of root growth.

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Are rice seed treatments worth the money? (1998)

This IREC Farmer Newsletter article presents result from a RIRDC project undertaken over three year.  Field and glasshouse experiments investigated the possible benefits of a range of additives to improve rice establishment. So far, none of the tested additives have increased early growth, establishment and yield. Therefore none of the tested treatments are recommended for use with rice. It is considered worthwhile to maintain a regular testing of new products that may improve growth and establishment of rice in the NSW industry.

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Rice season 1988/89 (September 1989)

This IREC Farmers Newsletter article presents the results of the 1988/89 season. The season saw record average yield of 8 tonnes per hectare. The article presents information on how this was achieved and the changes since 1980/81 season when the averages were 7.27 tonnes per hectare. The article states the improvements are a result of adoption o f high yielding semi dwarf varieties, improved nitrogen management, weed control and improved crop establishment. The article discusses issues such as aerial sowing, combine sowing, sod seeded pastures and stubble, varieties, growing conditions and yields. The article concludes that this improvement can be maintained by continuing to sow on time, the right rates of nitrogen and maintaining deep water at early pollen stage.

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Landforming advantages for Rice (1981)

This IREC Farmers Newsletter article presents information on the advantages for rice. The information presented in the article is extracted from the bound notes of a large Landforming seminar that was undertaken in Finley NSW. The notes were compiled from surveys undertaken on farmers and their experiences with Landforming. The articles covers information including why there are advantages of rice following landforming, rice ground preparation after landforming and agronomic change from Landforming. 

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