Posts tagged Seed
Diveristy array technology (DArT) for the rice breeding program. (2006)

This IREC Farmers Newsletter article reports on the DArT project. The project was undertaken at NSW DPI, Yanco Agricultural Institute and resulted in the development of a DArT reference panel to represent the genome of future breeding lines and introduced varieties. By using DArT it allows the breeders to to view the comparison of DNA parent line and their progeny. This allows for measuring genetic diversity among breeding lines and cultivars at the molecular level. There are currently (2006) 243 diverse rice varieties from around the world. Within this group there are 50 varieties that are used in Yancos breeding program. With in this project a subset of 69 semi dwarf lines were phenotyped for seedling vigor from this set the DArT analysis showed that 61 DArT markers that varied therefore specific DNA fragments associated with seeding vigour require improvement. 

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A Gene Machine for Functional Genomics of Rice- Link (February 2006)

his RIRDC report presents the findings from the project A gene machine for functional genomics of Rice. The report is presented in chapters each focussed on a specific section of the project. The key chapters are Development of tools and resources for producing rice insertion lines (Rice Gene Machine), A library of rice insertion lines – Rice Gene Machine, Rice Gene Machine – national and international collaboration, Case studies of gene identification using the Rice Gene Machine, Mining seedling vigour genes using the Rice Gene Machine - trait targeted research. Each chapter contains, background, objective materials, methods, outcomes and progress.  The overall outcomes was the development of a resource for rice functional genomics this project has made significant contribution in the form of a Rice Gene Machine -a library of insertional mutants. Using insertional mutants this research group has already identified several genes controlling plant growth and development. . This project also in conjunction with NSW Agricultural Genomics Centre, has produced new constructs and protocols for improved efficiency of mutagenesis and subsequent screening for stable insertion mutants. This research group has now developed collaborations with national and international laboratories to expand the Rice Gene Machine resource development as well as utilization. Using this Rice Gene Machine, this group is now concentrating on identifying genes controlling important agronomic traits such as seedling vigour and grain quality.

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The fate of water plantain seed at harvest (2001)


Headers have a large capacity to spread water plantain seed and there is little difference in the extent of spread as a result of harvesting with different header types.  Alisma plantago-aquatica, commonly called water plantain, is a big problem in the Murray Valley Irrigation Districts. It is not only rapidly increasing in numbers within fields, it is also spreading between fields. The main causes of spread of water plantain are thought to be by machinery, water, birds and contaminated rice seed.  The main factor that farmers can control directly is machinery. One type of machinery thought to be involved in weed seed spread is the header.

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WeedsCristy HoughtonWeeds, Seed
Rice Bay seed count check 200 Where are the seeds? (August 2001)


This IREC Farmer Newsletter presents the results of a pilot investigation undertaken in 2000 to determine whether the number of seeds/m2 in farmer paddocks from aerial sowing is comparable to the theoretical number of seeds sown. It was established that only 34% of rice seeds sown establish to become healthy rice plants. A field investigation in 2000 found that only 45-88% of seeds sown could be accounted for within a day or two after sowing. It is proposed that overlapping, sowing outside of banks and tidying up may account for 30% of seed not being sown in bays; poorly structured soils may also account for seed disappearance. These results appear to explain why the Ricecheck key check of 200-300 plants per/m2 has been so poorly adopted and difficult to achieve. 

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Interaction between rhizobia and rice seedlings (2000)

This IREC Farmers Newsletter article present and update and results on RIRDC project ANU34A investigating the interaction between rhizobia and rice seedlings. The results presented indicate that a number of bacterial strains tested can be significantly alter the growth of rice seedling. Many strains have the ability to colonise onto and survive inside rice seedling tissues without producing any gross disease effects of growth. It maybe possible in the future to inoculate rice in a similar manner to a legume to enhance plant growth. 

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Are rice seed treatments worth the money? (1998)

This IREC Farmer Newsletter article presents result from a RIRDC project undertaken over three year.  Field and glasshouse experiments investigated the possible benefits of a range of additives to improve rice establishment. So far, none of the tested additives have increased early growth, establishment and yield. Therefore none of the tested treatments are recommended for use with rice. It is considered worthwhile to maintain a regular testing of new products that may improve growth and establishment of rice in the NSW industry.

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Ground rigs for rice. (June 1997)

A recent workshop on techniques for ground spraying rice attracted around 45 growers, contractors and machinery dealers from throughout the industry.  Topics of discussion revolved around the pressing need for ground-based spraying options to avoid off-target drift and more timely treatment, need for more robust and comfortable methods of SCWIIRT application and the possibilities of using ground rigs for fertiliser and seed distribution.

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The potential of green manuring legume pasture (May, 1993)


This IREC Farmers Newsletter presents information on the increase in rice production area and decrease in rice/pasture rotations and the effects this is having on nitrogen fertiliser use.  One potential area to elevate this issue is incorporation of pastures and the use of short season rice varieties. This article presents results of a preliminary trial undertaken in the Murrami district in 1991/92 season. The conclusion of this preliminary trial was that cultivation should be carried out close to the time of rice sowing to allow for reduction in nitrogen losses. The pasture incorporation decreased the applied nitrogen requirement to achieve high yields compared to conventional practice of removal of pastures. It was relatively small amount of incorporation and a with larger amounts of pastures there could be possible greater yield response. The potential problems of seedling establishment, slime, straighthead and blood worm were not encountered in this trial. Further trials were planned for the following season. 

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Rice season 1988/89 (September 1989)

This IREC Farmers Newsletter article presents the results of the 1988/89 season. The season saw record average yield of 8 tonnes per hectare. The article presents information on how this was achieved and the changes since 1980/81 season when the averages were 7.27 tonnes per hectare. The article states the improvements are a result of adoption o f high yielding semi dwarf varieties, improved nitrogen management, weed control and improved crop establishment. The article discusses issues such as aerial sowing, combine sowing, sod seeded pastures and stubble, varieties, growing conditions and yields. The article concludes that this improvement can be maintained by continuing to sow on time, the right rates of nitrogen and maintaining deep water at early pollen stage.

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Muddy water in rice (November 1988)

This IREC Farmers Newsletter article presents information on the management of muddy water. The article provide information on soil, management, contributing factors including cold weather, infertility situations, variety, ducks, seed rate, leaf miner, deep water on poor layout, blood worm. The article also presents information on the effects of muddy water and management option to over come it. Changes in chemical nature of soil, increase in organic matter levels and avoid over cultivation are also discussed. The article concludes that by far the best approach will better increase organic matter levels by more productive pasture. The use of gypsum early in the pasture phase is also an option to ensure good establishment of pastures and so improve organic matter levels. 

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Rice seedling growth is influenced by water depth and temperature (1984)


This IREC Farmers Newsletter article presents the results of an experiment undertaken at Yanco Agricultural institute on Rice seedling growth is influenced by water depth and temperature. The conclusion of the trial suggested that water depth should be as shallow as possible during establishment however there is required to be a balance to maintain weed control. The results also indicated that deep water results in taller but weaker seedlings and slower growth would be more obvious at lower temperatures. M7 will always be shorter but more vigorous than other commercial varieties. Pelde indicated that more opportunities for stress when there is deep water and low temperatures and must be treated with caution during establishment.

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Why not sow wheat after rice harvest (1984)

This IREC Farmers Newsletter article presents information and strategies on sod sowing wheat after rice harvest. The research was undertaken over a five seasons. The article presents a number of reasons as to why sod sowing directly into rice stubble is better than other preparation techniques. These include the stubble providing a mulch, reduction in water loss from soil, slowing of weed growth and loss of seed to birds. Remain stubble provides a firm soil therefore allowing seed to be sown soon after rain. The conclusion of the report states that the trials over the five year period were successful and sod sowing in to rice stubble is time efficient and economically viable. 

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