Posts tagged Vegetative
Improving rice water use efficiency - Direct Drilling of rice and Precision Farming (June 2014)


Water use efficiency is a driving factor for the Australian rice industry. Australian rice farmers grow rice in one of the driest continents in the world, achieving some of the world’s highest yields per hectare and water use efficiency per kilogram produced (Dunn & Pal Singh, 2013). In recent years, the availability of water for agricultural production has been reduced significantly as a result of government policy. Australian rice farmers are also under constant scrutiny to justify their water usage, so need to develop new technologies and practices. Historically Australia is one of the few countries to establish a rice crop by flying rice seed into a flooded bay. The majority of the countries visited establish their crops by drilling seed into the soil and establish by flushing. In Australia, this technique could be more broadly adopted with significant savings in water use and input costs.

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Factors reducing rice establishment (August 2001)

This IREC Farmer Newsletter presents the results of a seven year grower survey undertaken in Finley region. The results of the farmer survey identify factors that impact on successful rice establishment. Ducks and wind are the main factors contributing to poor rice crop establishment. Deep water, as a result of heavy rain or herbicide use requirement, is also a significant factor.

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Rice Establishment survey (June 1997)


This IREC Farmers Newsletter presents information and results on a year survey undertaken in Finley region between 1993-1997. The survey was undertaken as a result of the Rice check data base and district agronomist feedback identifying poor rice establishment as one of the main factors limiting increases in yields. This article presents the results under topics of area’s affected by poor establishments, factors causing problem with establishment, links between sowing time , ducks, wind and deep water. The article concludes that over the four years poor establishment areas have been reduced. It was stated that  wind, ducks, deep water, muddy waters, ibis and slime were key factors affecting the poor areas. Over the four years the importance of wind, deep water, muddy water and surface vegetation at sowing diminished while importance of slime, ducks, Ibis, aquatic worms, blood worms, snail and aerial plane striping has increased. 

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Duck problem in rice crops (September 1989)

This IREC Farmers Newsletter article presents results of a short term study funded by CSIRO and Rice Research Committee assessing issues with ducks in rice. A survey was conducted with a 40% response rate. This article presents the results of the questionnaire. Following the questionnaire was an assessment of duck damage, observations of duck damage and possible control options. The article presents a list of options available for farmers as a result of the study. 

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Muddy water in rice (November 1988)

This IREC Farmers Newsletter article presents information on the management of muddy water. The article provide information on soil, management, contributing factors including cold weather, infertility situations, variety, ducks, seed rate, leaf miner, deep water on poor layout, blood worm. The article also presents information on the effects of muddy water and management option to over come it. Changes in chemical nature of soil, increase in organic matter levels and avoid over cultivation are also discussed. The article concludes that by far the best approach will better increase organic matter levels by more productive pasture. The use of gypsum early in the pasture phase is also an option to ensure good establishment of pastures and so improve organic matter levels. 

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Rice season 1985/86 (1986)

This IREC Farmers Newsletter article presents the results from the 1985 rice growing seasons. Pelde completely replaced Inga in 1985 and the feature of the season was low temperatures particularly during vegative, reproductive and delayed maturity which reduced yields. The reports presents the information on the sowing, temperatures for the season, the harvests and yields, weed control and nitrogen application. Low temperatures during early pollen formation stage also proved a hazard. However results still averaged 6.47 tonnes per hectare which was considered reasonable.  

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Nitrogen Fertiliser and Inga (1980)

This IREC Farmers Newsletter article presents information and results on district trials and trials undertaken at Yanco between 1978-80. The trials indicated that high applications of nitrogen as urea or ammonium sulphate have produces increased vegetative growth and tiller numbers but decrease in grain yields. The article presents these results. Ithe conclusion suggested although it is recommended for top dressing to be carried out at PI the trials indicated it could be up to two weeks post P. It was also stated that further research in different soil types were require to be undertaken and at the time advisable to top dress with in a week of PI. 

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Identifying rice problem (1979)

This IREC Farmers Newsletter presents information on problems that are observed in rice. The article covers pest such as Leaf Miner, bloodworms, ducks and snails. The article also presents information on Diuron residue and Dscamba cold weather and deep water and slime. The article covers each area in detail as to what to look out for and how to identify the problem. 

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Aerial sowing of Rice (1969)

Aerial sowing was introduced into the Murray Valley in 1963 said Former District Agronomist, Mr B J Scott, two areas of 20 acres were sown at Tullakool in conjunction with salted land reclamation investigations being carried out at that time, since then the aerial sown acreage has increased to over 10,000 acres in 1968.

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