Posts tagged Weeds
Rice Extension on the New Grower Services Web Portal for SunRice (2014)

Access to the RICE EXTENSION TAB will be for all growers who will have a login, and also to Advisors, non-SunRice growers, researchers who will need to be set up with a login password access. This group are an important link for future extension to be successful.

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Improving rice water use efficiency - Direct Drilling of rice and Precision Farming (June 2014)


Water use efficiency is a driving factor for the Australian rice industry. Australian rice farmers grow rice in one of the driest continents in the world, achieving some of the world’s highest yields per hectare and water use efficiency per kilogram produced (Dunn & Pal Singh, 2013). In recent years, the availability of water for agricultural production has been reduced significantly as a result of government policy. Australian rice farmers are also under constant scrutiny to justify their water usage, so need to develop new technologies and practices. Historically Australia is one of the few countries to establish a rice crop by flying rice seed into a flooded bay. The majority of the countries visited establish their crops by drilling seed into the soil and establish by flushing. In Australia, this technique could be more broadly adopted with significant savings in water use and input costs.

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Rice field guide to pests, disease and weeds in southern New South Wales. (2013)

This DPI NSW rice field guide covers pests such as Bloodworms, Water snails, Leafminers, Aquatic earthworm, Common armyworm, Sugarcane and maize stemborer Tadpole shrimp , Yabbies, Locusts and grasshoppers Exotic pest threats. It also covers diseases such as Damping off, Stem rot, Downy mildew Cochliobolus leaf spot Sheath spot Aggregate sheath spot Glume blotch, Sheath brown rot Sheath and glume rot Exotic disease threats. Finally is gives details of weeds such as Impact of sowing method Integrated weed management Barnyard grasses, Silvertop grass, Dirty Dora Starfruit Arrowhead Alisma, Water plantain Sagittaria, Umbrella sedge Water couch Cumbungi (bulrush) Rushes, Common spike rush Bolboschoenus Alligator weed Water primrose Chara and Nitella. Each pest, disease and weeds has its lifecycle, crop damage, management, origins and key characteristics described to assist farmers. 

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Rice Crop protection guide (August 2012)

This is a twenty eight page Primefact guide by the NSW DPI to be used as a guide for weed and pest management of a rice crop. It is divided into sections that the cover pesticide selections and use, planting back guidelines, intergrated weed management. The next section is the guidelines for spraying pesticides onto rice crops, herbicide resistance management for weed control in rice. Following on from this the multiple programs displayed in tables for drill sown herbicide use, aerial sown herbicide programs that are divided into pre sowing. This section is followed by post sowing pre emergence, then early post emergence, guides to rotating herbicides and herbicide resistance. The guide then covers the insects, snails and earthworms and gives guidelines to manage such pests.

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Less water with late water- results from delayed permanent water experiment. (2009)

This IREC Farmer Newsletter article presents an overview of the 1st year trial of the use of delayed permanent water in rice production in Southern NSW. It was acknowledged that delaying of permanent water resulted in reduced water use however whether water productivity ($/ML) is increased will depend on grain yield and would not be determined until post harvest. It is suggested that research into nitrogen management greenhouse gas emissions of the delayed flood practice is necessary. The article describes the experiment with overviews of measuring the benefits, the irrigation treatments, nitrogen managements, weed controls, irrigation use and crop growth. The final recommendation included the necessity to research into nitrogen management and greenhouse gas emissions using the delayed flood practice.

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New weed management options for Australian rice - RIRDC Project AGR-9A (2008)

Not sowing rice may be a valid herbicide resistance strategy but it is clearly not a preferred pathway for 1600 Riverina rice farmers who remain frustrated with a productive farming system, a strong market for their crop, an innovative processing company, but no water to produce their crop! With long lead times to attain a registered herbicide in rice, our research program for weed control is focussed ahead for the times when irrigation water is once again available.  With long lead times to attain a registered herbicide in rice, our research program for weed control is focussed ahead for the times when irrigation water is once again available.   As a result of contacts made in Japan and the USA during and prior to 2006, four herbicide candidates were field tested in Australia during the 2006–07 summer.  Two experimental herbicides have been identified, one for grass weed control and another for broadleaf and sedge weeds, both of which potentially present new modes of action.

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The Happy Seeder enables direct drilling of wheat into rice stubble (January 2007)

This journal article present the results of the Happy seeder direct drilling wheat into rice stubble. The Happy seeder aims to reduce the need to burn rice stubble and in Australia and South East Asia. The focus of the Happy seeder is to enable direct drilling into tough dense rice stubble which is currently an obstruction to sowing into rice stubble. The article states that loss of organic matter and nutrients, rice stubble burning causes very serious and widespread air pollution in the north-west Indo-Gangetic Plains, where rice–wheat systems predominate. The Happy Seeder combines the stubble mulching and seed drilling functions in the one machine. The stubble is cut and picked up in front of the sowing tynes, which engage bare soil, and deposited behind the seed drill as mulch. This article presents the  evaluation of the technology over 3 years in replicated experiments and farmers’ fields in Punjab, India. 

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Study of Japanese rice herbicide innovation - RIRDC Project AGR-9A (June 2006)

This report presents the findings of a week travel tour of Japan in June 2006 by Malcolm Taylor the Australian rice weed specialist. The tours primary objective was to identify active ingredients in the herbicide mixtures under that were under currently under testing that may prove suitable for water seeded rice production in Australia. Compounds that offer alternate odes of action t Benzofenap were a key focus of the tour. The outcome of the tour included key contact being made with representatives of five Japanese manufacturers. Included in this were three formal presentations to these manufacturers regarding Australian requirements for new rice herbicides. Negotiations have commenced to enable samples of promising compounds to be made available for testing in Australia in the 2006-2007 rice season. 

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Study of Japanese rice herbicide innovation - RIRDC Project AGR-9A (June 2006)

This report presents the findings of a week travel tour of Japan in June 2006 by Malcolm Taylor the Australian rice weed specialist. The tours primary objective was to identify active ingredients in the herbicide mixtures under that were under currently under testing that may prove suitable for water seeded rice production in Australia. Compounds that offer alternate odes of action t Benzofenap were a key focus of the tour. The outcome of the tour included key contact being made with representatives of five Japanese manufacturers. Included in this were three formal presentations to these manufacturers regarding Australian requirements for new rice herbicides. Negotiations have commenced to enable samples of promising compounds to be made available for testing in Australia in the 2006-2007 rice season. 

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Allelopathic Potential in Rice to Control Arrowhead in New South Wales Rice Crops - CHAPTERS 1 ONLY (2003)

Twenty-eight rice (Oryza saliva L.) varieties with different countries of origin, maturity and stage of improvement were screened in the laboratory for allelopathic potential against arrowhead (Sagittaria montevidensis), a weed infesting rice crops of southeast New South Wales, Australia. In addition, three West African crosses between Oryza saliva and 0. glaberrima, one 0. glabbermia variety and two of the wildest 0. saliva varieties in the Yanco Agricultural Institute's germplasm collection were tested.  Using the Equal Compartment Agar Method (ECAM), significant differences were found among rice varieties in their ability to suppress the root growth of arrowhead seedlings. The degree of inhibition ranged from 26.6% to 99.7%. As some rice varieties have a much greater allelopathic effect, there appears to be a genetic basis for this differential allelopathic potential.

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